Tuesday, 5 December 2000

From "The Social Contract"

By Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

[...] what makes the will general is less the number of voters than the common interest uniting them; for, under this system, each necessarily submits to the conditions he imposes on others: and this admirable agreement between interest and justice gives to the common deliberations an equitable character which at once vanishes when any particular question is discussed, in the absence of a common interest to unite and identify the ruling of the judge with that of the party [...]

No comments: