Tuesday, 28 November 2000

From "The Second Treatise of Civil Government"

By John Locke.

These are the bounds which the trust, that is put in them by the society, and the law of God and nature, have set to the legislative power of every common-wealth, in all forms of government.

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First, They are to govern by promulgated established laws, not to be varied in particular cases, but to have one rule for rich and poor, for the favourite at court, and the country man at plough.

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Secondly, These laws also ought to be designed for no other end ultimately, but the good of the people.

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Thirdly, They must not raise taxes on the property of the people, without the consent of the people, given by themselves, or their deputies. And this properly concerns only such governments where the legislative is alw ays in being, or at least where the people have not reserved any part of the legislative to deputies, to be from time to time chosen by themselves.

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Fourthly, The legislative neither must nor can transfer the power of making laws to any body else, or place it any where, but where the people have.

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